Stranger Things T-shirt created by Emerson student

Emerson College student Reagan Allen and her Stranger Things T-shirt. | Photo provided

This is a code red, Boston. We cracked the code on a local college student who designed a Stranger Things T-shirt to help support her home state of Texas. We’ll save you a trip to the upside down. Grab your bikes + Eggos — here’s the scoop.

It only took ~20 minutes for Emerson College student Reagan Allen to create a T-shirt that has helped to raise $35,000+ to support the Uvalde community. 

Stranger Things Season Four Volume Two was released last weekend and the new season has broken records, becoming Netflix’s most viewed show across a seven-day period.

When Season Four premiered on May 27, the rising senior noticed the character Nancy Wheeler sporting apparel from Emerson College — the liberal arts school across from the Common.

Reagan recreated the crest logo design from the 80s, which this season takes place in, and shared it on Twitter

“I didn’t want to profit off of it because it’s not my design, but I did want the shirt and clearly a lot of other people did too,” she said. “Donating the profits was the natural place my mind went to.” 

Reagan, a San Antonio native (hey SATXtoday), created a fundraiser on Bonfire.com and began her campaign to support the Uvalde community. The response that followed was something Reagan never would have imagined

“I made the design the day the show dropped and launched the campaign the next day,” Reagan said. “By that night, we had already made $5,000.”

Through the support of the Emerson community, the fundraiser has sold over 3,000 T-shirts. The shirts even made their way to the Stranger Things team, thanks to an Emerson alum who works for the production department. 

You can purchase the shirt, which is available in three different styles from $27, for two more weeks. All proceeds will go to the Texas Elementary School Shooting Victims Fund.  

“It’s been incredibly uplifting seeing my college community uplifting my home community,” Reagan said. “You can make such a tangible change. It feels like you can’t do anything, but you can.”